Porsche Boxster 987 Market Snapshot

I was asked to take a look at a pre-purchase valuation for a Porsche Boxster S (987 S) earlier this week and it turned up some interesting data. The car in question was a very high spec car finished in nice colours, but with higher than average mileage of circa 70k.

A look at the other cars on the market showed that, while the asking price was at the very top of the scale for cars being sold privately, the mileage was in the top 30% of all cars available. This was definitely amiss. The seller had added a very high premium for some of the spec items that the average private buyer simply would not value as high. My advice to the prospective buyer was to keep his powder dry and watch for bargains turning up towards the back end of the year.

Anyone selling their car at the minute must remember that the car market has been hard work through 2019. Current new car registration figures shows a very small lift in September over last year but the month is down over 27% compared to the peak in 2016. The market is not at full speed and this is a reflection of the wider economic picture. All of this general lack of consumer confidence has a knock-on effect on the used car market.

Sports cars are non-essential purchases and their values are more subject to external market forces than most other sectors. While 4x4s can get a bit of a lift in winter regardless of the economic picture, and vans get a bit of a lift around Christmas when deliveries are at their peak, sports cars peak when the weather is good and are a fairly low priority for most people through the rest of the year.

My client on this valuation had just sold his Boxster: a 2.7 987 with 105k miles. “I sold my 2.7 for £7500: full asking price. I made it stand out, though: painted the bumper, put new tyres on, cleaned it properly. It was a 2007, 245hp manual model with a few nice extras, OPC and specialist history. I had it for 5 years and put 30k on it. Paid £10k when I bought it. Possibly the best value sports car ever!”

While all this sounds great, the devil is in the detail. The sale was not easy, as the buyer was the only person who actually came to view the car. The seller had loads of timewasters and dreamers, offering £4-5k or to pay the car off monthly.

A quick look on Autotrader for 2007 Porsche Boxsters with circa 100k miles shows 32 cars with prices running from £7,500 to £17,000. The highest price is an outlier with 11k miles, with the next lowest at just under £15k. The spread of private sales runs from £7.5k for a 99k-mile Tip to just under £12k for a 42k-mile manual.

Retail asking prices for 2007 Porsche Boxster 987 2.7 manuals with 40-44k miles hover around the £11,850 mark, so assuming condition is more or less identical, how likely is a buyer to pay the same price for a private car as a dealer would charge for a car with 0% finance available and a warranty included? I think you know the answer.

The classified ads are full of private sellers asking strong money for average cars with the assertion that “if it doesn’t sell I will keep it over winter and sell it next year” or words to that effect. In this market, with book drops every month and very little likelihood of a bounce over winter, people need to take their first profit.

Many private sellers are going to have to try harder if they want their cars to sell. If they are really not bothered about selling, take their ‘meh’ cars off the market. Low supply of good examples is the best way to help the price of their car over time. If you want to sell, then get with the programme.


To learn more about my work and commission my valuation expertise, you can: 

On Modified Porsche Valuations

While my client work includes valuations for many standard Porsches, a high percentage of the original, unmodified cars I value sit outside the norm: perhaps they are low mileage/high mileage, left-hand drive instead of RHD or they may be restorations where the owner wants a higher percentage of the cost to replace taken into account compared to the one-size-fits-all valuation that a club or insurer might suggest.

Standard cars with minor deviations from average, run-of-the-mill examples are fairly straightforward to value. It is all about taking a view on the impact to the retail price of whatever change applies, putting that view into pound notes and deciding where the final calculation sits in the context of the market. Modified Porsches require a similar process, albeit the work takes place over several stages.

My earliest bespoke Porsche valuations were all for modified Porsches. At the time I was working for Glass’s Guide and had just bought my first 911. As an enthusiast of modified cars of all marques and the owner of several examples, I was spending a lot of time attending track days and modified Porsche meets, such as the monthly Ace Cafe German car night and annual Oulton Park RS day. This allowed me to meet and speak with owners of modified cars and understand just how exposed they were to serious financial loss in a write-off scenario.

Back then, Porsches were changing hands for much lower prices. I had a 964RS in my garage for six months; value was somewhere in the mid 30s. My modified 1976 Carrera 3.0 (which I still own today) cost me less than £20k and the higher mileage SCs that people were basing hot rods on were selling for less than £10k. A modified car based on the same SC with restored or upgraded bodywork, drivetrain and interior might have cost circa £30k to build, but, with no real data to go on, insurance companies were forced to look at selling prices for standard cars to settle total loss claims (all claims at the time verged on total loss, as the cars had such a low value).

My first valuation for a modified Porsche was over fifteen years ago, with a Ruf 911 Carrera RCT Evo. Based on a 964 Turbo-look Celebration/Jubilee model, this was a turbocharged car making 425 bhp and incredible to drive. The value was agreed with AON Private Clients in the mid-30s: the equivalent of a decent 964RS at the time. A few weeks later, the car went on a track day and was crashed. The repair estimate came back at well over £50k and so the car was declared a write off. To their credit, AON paid out the agreed value within days. The loss of such a great car was a sad event, but the owner emerged unscathed and everyone ultimately went away happy.

Valuing the Ruf RCT was not too challenging. We had recent market data and the car was well under six figures in any case. Nowadays, things are not so straightforward. Some cars can top seven-figure valuations. A number of my customers run modern GT3s with a list of modifications that can sometimes rival the car’s purchase price. I have hundreds of modified air-cooled cars on my books, from 356s right through pre-’73 911s and up to 964 and 993 retro builds. I also value cars with incredible history: calculating what a famous previous owner or unique race history may add to the value can be an interesting exercise.

While it doesn’t happen that often, I sometimes get valuation enquiries from owners who want to value their car based on a total receipted cost to build. In such cases, I will usually decline the opportunity to provide a valuation, as the desired or target number is simply too high. No market data exists for their aspirations and defending that statement in court in a total loss situation would be difficult. If your current valuation is based on that approach, just bear the overall market data picture in mind.

I work along the lines that there are three end users for every valuation I provide: the owner, the insurer and my own reputation. The client and the insurer are equally important: fairness will always be key to an amicable settlement. Even on modified cars where no similar examples have recently come to market, one must have some form of market data to support the valuation. If an insurer queries a valuation in the event of a claim, I want to be in a position to answer that query with links to data on identical or comparable cars.

All valuations for modified cars begin with a look at the base vehicle: what is under the skin of this machine.?Then we get into the list of modifications and the quality involved. ‘Who did the work?’ beats ‘what did it cost?’ As I work around these cars most days of the week, I have seen lots of examples of work by various specialists and they are not all the same. Modifications carried out by a technically proficient owner may have cost less than specialist prices but the work can be of a much higher quality. The quality of the build has a significant impact on any insurance valuation for a modified Porsche.

As so many owners admire the standard appearance of factory bodywork, modifications are often limited to purely drivetrain and chassis mods. Engine rebuilds are popular and they certainly do add value, whereas aftermarket wheels and track day tyres have much less of an impact. Changes to the interior such as a full retrim to rebuild the seats and delete tired body-colour piping can make a sizeable difference, but smaller, reversible changes such as the fitment of a Porsche Classic radio may only make a noticeable effect as part of a wider theme.

Porsche Resto-Mod Valuations

The appetite for modified Porsches has led to several specialist workshops emerging for resto-mod builds on air-cooled 911s, including SC, 3.2 Carrera, 964 and 993. These workshops build cars to a unique specification for private owners but not all owners hold on to their cars. Even when sold close to the date of completion, the selling price for a distinctive build can sometimes be well below what the car first cost to put together, so it is important to bear this in mind when valuing for insurance.

Owners who keep their resto-mod builds for a number of years might interpret this as putting them at a disadvantage, but every case is valued on its own merits. The beauty of escaping the one-size-fits-all mass market valuation methodology and switching to a more tailored approach is that what you end up with fits you and you alone.

My aim is to provide a valuation where your unique situation is covered to the very best advantage and where the insurer understands that time and effort has gone into achieving the right valuation. In claims for theft or total loss, this start point leads to hassle free settlements. That result is well worth the modest investment in a bespoke valuation.


To learn more about my work and commission my valuation expertise, drop me an email or: 

1972 Porsche 911 2.4S restoration insured

I recently enjoyed a good discussion on insurance valuations and the state of the market with the owner of a very smart 1972 RHD Porsche 911 2.4S. 

This particular Porsche 911 is quite a rare bird. Said to be one of just two RHD ’72 cars originally finished in desirable Viper Green, the car has just been through a full restoration costing more than £120,000. The body and trim was redone by a well known shop in the south east, while the engine and transmission were refurbished by RPM Technik.

It is rare to find a Porsche owner who doesn’t have a rough idea what their car is worth, and this owner was no exception.  The restoration had taken over a year, putting the purchase date back in the high days, so the expectations were somewhat in tune with that. I never like to disappoint on value, so I did quite a bit of work to try and get to the owner’s preferred number, but we still ended up meeting somewhere south of the initial proposal.

While demand across the classic Porsche market has softened since the high points of 2015 and early 2016, buyers are still looking for good opportunities to invest in rare RHD examples with warranted low mileage and an attractive original spec. A 1972 RHD Porsche 911 S definitely meets that criteria, but few are keen to pay 2016 prices in a much softer market.

UK dealers are currently offering a range of 71-73 911S models with prices ranging from £130-£250k. My opinion kicks off somewhere in the middle of that range for lived in but well presented  RHD examples.  £200k is a lot of money to spend on an early car without an RS badge and there are some good opportunities elsewhere from an investment point of view. 

A 911 S in RHD in just-restored condition is a handsome machine that would turn my head every day of the week. There are always going to be people (mostly those who rely on early 911 sales to make a living) who would argue that selling prices for these cars are still in the mid £200k-bracket, but whether the market would really stand over £200k to buy a car like this right now is debatable. That said, it’s the ballpark I would advise on the nicest examples for insurance purposes. 

Porsche 996 Carrera Manual vs Tiptronic Prices

Just updated an insurance valuation for a regular customer who owns a nice low mileage Porsche 996 Targa Tiptronic. While Porsche 996 models have not seen the huge jumps of the air-cooled classic 911 models, 996 prices have crept up steadily over the last five years and values are now well and truly trending upwards. This makes an annual update to valuations more important than ever.

Porsche 996 Buyers Guide/Buying Tips

From a driver’s point of view, there is not much wrong with 996s. The early 3.4-litre models cover the 0-60 dash in just over 5 seconds, but those engines were troublesome, so Porsche replaced the 3.4 with a 3.6-litre engine in 2001. This engine also has a number of weak points, but it is undeniably more powerful and ideally the one to go for when considering a 996.

In 2002, the cars had a bit of a facelift to distance the styling from the visually similar Boxster. This was another successful upgrade. With the bigger engine and the more handsome front end on offer, most buyers will now be looking for post-2002 3.6 litre models, thus keeping values higher for later examples. That is not to say that early cars don’t have their charms, just that market demand supports higher prices for later cars (i.e. the so-called Mk II 996).

A few years ago, I came very close to buying a 2003 996 Carrera and often wish I had gone for it. Driving the car was a great experience. The big difference from early 911 (pre-’89) to 996 is the physical size of the later car, the increased creature comforts offered by the more modern example and the sweeter manual shift in the 996.

Some decisions are a no-brainer on 996. I think you want a 3.6-litre and also a facelift car, so the next big decision after that when buying a 996 is whether to go for manual or tiptronic transmission. I like Tiptronic – it is fitted to my Cayenne S and works beautifully – and if you spend a lot of time driving then Tiptronic is great. But for a better resale market, manual transmission is the winner.

Here’s the thing. Tiptronic can be shifted like a manual and it is a wonderful Porsche-patented invention, but sticking a fluid-filled torque converter between the engine and gearbox does blunt the experience. It feels wonderfully smooth when Alpine touring with the mrs or carrying the kids around, but when you’re on your own and looking for fun, a manual gearbox will do it better.

Porsche 996 Manual vs Tiptronic Transmission prices

Porsche is not making any more 996s, so the supply of cars is limited. A Tiptronic-to-manual conversion is a hard thing to do (and ultimately not a great idea) so either you find what you like with a manual transmission, or you find it with Tiptronic. You will find it easier with Tip as those cars are in lower demand, and you will probably find it cheaper, too. So sometimes Tiptronic makes plenty of sense. Manual cars tend to have been driven harder and will show more wear. All of these things make a difference to value!

Anyone who tells you that the manual-to-tip price premium is a set number of a grand or two grand or five grand is talking from where the sun don’t shine. The price difference from manual transmission to Tiptronic in a Porsche 996 depends entirely on spec, condition, mileage and options. There is also the bodystyle to consider but that is another issue entirely.

A general indication on a £30k C2 Coupe in very good all-round condition and offered with sensible mileage is that Tiptronic should save circa £2k or so, but for some cars it could be twice that, for others it could be less. It really depends on what else the car has to offer and how many similar cars are available.

Contact us to discuss an agreed insurance valuation for your Porsche 996. Values cost just £35 and are accepted by all UK insurers. Our valuations are guaranteed independent, so no arguments later regarding conflict of opinions when your dealer or specialist values the car they sold you or look after for you!

All content ©  2017. No reproduction without prior agreement.

Porsche Owners Up to 90% Under-Insured

The Telegraph reports that some Porsche owners are up to 90% under-insured.

“An index of the most valuable cars compiled by the Historic Automobile Group International has risen about 500% in the decade to December 2013. Ten years ago, a 1974 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” Coupé was worth approximately £76,000, for example. It is now worth nearer £450,000.

Gerry Bucke, general manager at Adrian Flux Insurance Services, said: “We reviewed our classic car portfolio, and noticed that a number of our customers had declared values that looked very low in today’s market.”

Porsche Values Increase by 1000% in 18 Years

The Telegraph spoke to one Porsche owner, Darren Campbell from Surrey. Darren bought a 1970 Porsche 911S some 18 years ago. he paid £8,000 but a recent insurance valuation put the car at a staggering £80,000: ten times his purchase price.

“I think if you’ve bought one of these quite recently you’re more likely to keep an eye on the market values, but if you’ve had it for as long as I have it’s easy to take your eye off the ball,” said Darren.

Under-Insurance could cost owners “Tens of Thousands of Pounds”

“Some of the cars have almost doubled in value since the owner’s last valuation,” said Gerry Bucke at Adrian Flux. “Under-insurance works on classic car insurance – where the premium is partly calculated based on the value – in a similar way to home insurance, so owners could end up only receiving a percentage of the car’s true value.”

“We suggest reviewing valuations every year. Otherwise, if the worst happens, you could lose anything from a couple of hundred pounds to tens of thousands.”

Get a Porsche Valuation

Porsche Valuations is the leading UK source of agreed insurance valuations for classic Porsche. All we need is some information on condition, a selection of photos and a phone conversation. The service costs £35 payable by bank transfer or Paypal. Visit our “Get a Valuation” page to start.

Modified Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport Valuation

Spotted a familiar car at Tuthill Porsche yesterday: Simeon’s modified Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera hot rod.

Based on a 1985 chassis, this 911 is a great example of impact bumper upgradery. Now kitted out with Tuthill 6-pot brakes, EXE-TC suspension, Recaro trim and an engine transplant, the Carrera also runs a torquey 3.6-litre engine, rebuilt by Nick at Redtek to give 290bhp.

I first encountered Simeon’s car for its 2013 insurance valuation. Back then it was painted mid metallic blue, but it now wears a colour worthy of its sass. Somewhat reminiscent of Oli Wheeler’s Lime Green 3.2 update, last seen at Cameron Sports Cars down in Wiltshire, the big difference is Oli’s car (previously owned by Chris Harris) ran a stock engine, with Jenvey throttle bodies and an Omex ECU.

Insurance valuations for modified Porsche 911s can go a number of ways. Some 911s are modified in a way that adds to a likely selling price and also increases the replacement value: Simeon’s being one of these cars. But the value for insurance purposes is not always equal to total spend on the car.

Of course, other modified Porsches can sometimes be worth less than a nice condition original Porsche, but then life is not just about the value of objects. Sometimes it is better to do whatever floats your boat, and enjoy life rather than focusing on money.

Need an agreed insurance valuation for a UK classic Porsche? Visit our ‘Get a Valuation’ page.

Porsche Insurance Valuations for All Models

Market valuation insurance policies on classic cars are the wrong way to go. If someone steals your classic Porsche in impeccable condition tomorrow, a market value policy will create no end of hassle and may leave you seriously out of pocket. This is when you need an agreed value classic Porsche insurance policy with assistance from a UK valuation expert.

Porsche Insurance Valuations UK

Porsche valuation consultant, John Glynn, has clocked up almost thirty years in the motor industry, buying and selling cars for trade and retail. John also spent ten years as an Editor with Glass’s Guide in the UK valuing older cars, vintage classic vehicles and ‘modern classics’, for clients in the trade and the financial services industry.

“Always run an agreed value policy on your classic Porsche,” John insists. “It’s the easiest way to ensure you will be properly compensated should the worst ever happen. Never leave the total loss of a car worth tens of thousands of pounds open for debate. Always agree a value.”

John does agreed insurance valuations on classic Porsche cars that are accepted by every UK insurance company, even when an independent engineer’s inspection is required to begin with. Agreed valuations cost £35. Go to our ‘Get A Valuation‘ page to submit your details.

Don’t own a Porsche? We own, collect and issue insurance valuations for all makes and models of classic cars. Contact us for more information.

Mileage Adjusting Classic Porsche Values

Mileage is a thorny subject on Porsches. How hard do you hit a high-mileage Porsche versus something with average distance? Everyone has an opinion: mine comes from ten years creating and maintaining mileage tables for ‘normal’ cars, as Glass’s Guide Editor for Older Cars and Consumer Values. Glass’s is like the UK’s Kelly Blue Book, and traders here are very hot on mileage adjustments.

Glass’s don’t do mileage tables for Porsche cars and the like, as mileage adjusting prestige sports and supercars is a complex strategy requiring some research into history, maintenance, big money spent and condition at the point of sale. One can’t simply say “£1,000 off per ten thousand miles” as, on some Porsche cars, that would leave nothing.

A Porsche 911 acquaintance recently sold his much-loved Porsche 993 Carrera 2S with a terrific spec. I valued this Porsche car for insurance, which prompted the owner to review his priorities: a process which led to a private sale ad on Pistonheads, and the immediate sale to a very sharp buyer.

This 993 C2S was well up on the miles at just over 200,000, but had bills totalling tens of thousands of pounds. Everything worked, including the electric hardback seats and air con. A full service history showed an engine rebuild at 187k including RS flywheel and clutch, uprated cams, and a remap to 330 bhp with 300 torques.

At 192k, the transmission was rebuilt, with new pinion shaft bearings and a Porsche Motorsport four-plate LSD. At 197k miles, the body was redone; glass out, corrosion in the screen apertures corrected and a respray in proper Vesuvius. New windscreen, and wheels refurbed to match the paint.

At 200k, the suspension was gifted some KW Variant 3 dampers and springs, new rear control arms, front wishbone bushes, eccentric assemblies and bolts for camber adjustment. Taking all this into account while bearing the mileage in mind was quite a tricky process.

The adjusted sale price seemed a bargain for this car, which I valued rather higher for insurance. The seller is happy and I guess the new owner is too, but I wouldn’t want to have to replace that car with only the selling price to spend. Remember your insurance values – always agree when offered the chance, and watch that rising market!

Need an agreed insurance valuation for your classic UK Porsche? Go to our ‘Get a Valuation’ page.

Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport Agreed Valuation

On a visit to Autofarm last week, Josh Sadler and I got talking about a Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Club Sport he had sitting in the corner of a barn. It looked a smart car: totally standard in very good nick.

The Club Sport was owned by Porsche author, Gordon Wingrove, and was famously featured in one of the mags as an accident repair on one side a few years back. With just 27,000 miles on the clock, this is a special Club Sport. The model has its detractors, who love to point out it’s a basic Carrera 3.2 with a lighter interior and a blueprinted engine, but those who have driven one know there’s something else.

Josh has heard all the Club Sport knockers but, as he asks: “What else is there from the 1980s? This is it.” I reminded him of the 5-speed 930, but I agreed on the affordable/available 911 road car side. There’s plenty of front-engined Porsche stuff from that era, but they’re not rare-bird 911s and the SC RS and 959 hardly count.

Coincidentally, two days later I was asked to do an insurance valuation on a different Porsche 911 3.2 Club Sport, one I’ve seen a few times (I value a number of the UK Club Sport cars ). I had talked money with Josh and used that conversation as a reference for the valuation on this other 911 Club Sport.

What’s the forecast for Club Sport values? I think steady, trending slightly upwards to match the base model. There were only 53 RHD ‘Clubbies’ made for the UK and only 29 of those are estimated to survive (possible urban myth). Standard Carreras in the best condition are £30k+ now, but there are many hundreds of those cars. So a factory hot rod in tip top notch has to be worth substantially more than a regular 3.2 Carrera Coupe. Try replacing a Club Sport after total loss: that’s not going to be pleasant.

Classic Porsche 356 stolen at the Nurburgring

While visiting the Nürburging in Germany, the owner of this 1956 Porsche 356 woke to find his car had been stolen from outside the Hotel Hohe Acht. Two more 356 models were also stolen at the track on the same night. German Police have so far come up empty-handed but that is hardly a surprise: this was carried out by professionals and there will be a plan in place to get these things out of the area as soon as possible.

This particular car was a peach. The owner bought the car in 1970 and, working as a 356 spare parts manufacturer in Denmark, it has been with him for 40 years of a life in Porsche. A €15,000 reward was offered for any information leading to the safe return.

This is not the first 356 theft we’ve seen this year. Certainly classic Porsches are getting ever-easier to steal: a quick colour change and a few bits swapped (including chassis number) and no one would be any the wiser on what it once was. If you’re not using security on your classic, then fix that quickly.

I use a high-end steering lock and good alarm on mine  – plus other unnamed measures – which would slow any potential thieves down a bit. The agreed valuation for insurance purposes is also up to date! Remember to always keep your agreed insurance valuation up to date for total peace of mind. It does not add much to the premium but saves a huge amount of hassle in the long run.