Mileage Adjusting Classic Porsche Values

Mileage is a thorny subject on Porsches. How hard do you hit a high-mileage Porsche versus something with average distance? Everyone has an opinion: mine comes from ten years creating and maintaining mileage tables for ‘normal’ cars, as Glass’s Guide Editor for Older Cars and Consumer Values. Glass’s is like the UK’s Kelly Blue Book, and traders here are very hot on mileage adjustments.

Glass’s don’t do mileage tables for Porsche cars and the like, as mileage adjusting prestige sports and supercars is a complex strategy requiring some research into history, maintenance, big money spent and condition at the point of sale. One can’t simply say “£1,000 off per ten thousand miles” as, on some Porsche cars, that would leave nothing.

A Porsche 911 acquaintance recently sold his much-loved Porsche 993 Carrera 2S with a terrific spec. I valued this Porsche car for insurance, which prompted the owner to review his priorities: a process which led to a private sale ad on Pistonheads, and the immediate sale to a very sharp buyer.

This 993 C2S was well up on the miles at just over 200,000, but had bills totalling tens of thousands of pounds. Everything worked, including the electric hardback seats and air con. A full service history showed an engine rebuild at 187k including RS flywheel and clutch, uprated cams, and a remap to 330 bhp with 300 torques.

At 192k, the transmission was rebuilt, with new pinion shaft bearings and a Porsche Motorsport four-plate LSD. At 197k miles, the body was redone; glass out, corrosion in the screen apertures corrected and a respray in proper Vesuvius. New windscreen, and wheels refurbed to match the paint.

At 200k, the suspension was gifted some KW Variant 3 dampers and springs, new rear control arms, front wishbone bushes, eccentric assemblies and bolts for camber adjustment. Taking all this into account while bearing the mileage in mind was quite a tricky process.

The adjusted sale price seemed a bargain for this car, which I valued rather higher for insurance. The seller is happy and I guess the new owner is too, but I wouldn’t want to have to replace that car with only the selling price to spend. Remember your insurance values – always agree when offered the chance, and watch that rising market!

Need an agreed insurance valuation for your classic UK Porsche? Go to our ‘Get a Valuation’ page.