Classic Porsche 356 stolen at the Nurburgring

While visiting the Nürburging in Germany, the owner of this 1956 Porsche 356 woke to find his car had been stolen from outside the Hotel Hohe Acht. Two more 356 models were also stolen at the track on the same night. German Police have so far come up empty-handed but that is hardly a surprise: this was carried out by professionals and there will be a plan in place to get these things out of the area as soon as possible.

This particular car was a peach. The owner bought the car in 1970 and, working as a 356 spare parts manufacturer in Denmark, it has been with him for 40 years of a life in Porsche. A €15,000 reward was offered for any information leading to the safe return.

This is not the first 356 theft we’ve seen this year. Certainly classic Porsches are getting ever-easier to steal: a quick colour change and a few bits swapped (including chassis number) and no one would be any the wiser on what it once was. If you’re not using security on your classic, then fix that quickly.

I use a high-end steering lock and good alarm on mine  – plus other unnamed measures – which would slow any potential thieves down a bit. The agreed valuation for insurance purposes is also up to date! Remember to always keep your agreed insurance valuation up to date for total peace of mind. It does not add much to the premium but saves a huge amount of hassle in the long run.

European Porsche Values: Essen Techno Classica

Another year, another Essen Techno Classica as I visited Germany with a pair of fellow Porsche nuts. The 2014 show weather was gorgeous all the way through, prompting a half day sitting by the Rhine, watching the world go by rather than slogging around seventeen halls of old cars.

In three days, we ate enough pork to fill a 911 and drank enough beer to sink one. We drove there in a Saab diesel estate, which did all the European miles on one tank of fuel: impressive. Even more impressive was the amount of Merlot crammed into it on the way out of France.

There are always Porsches at Essen, but the number of classic Porsche cars on show in 2014 was lower than in previous years. Some very lovely 356s, a handful of pre-1968 911s and not as many impact bumper (IB) cars as two years ago. I spotted one or two 928s, but 924s and 944s were thin on the ground.

A good showing of Porsche 964 911s this year. A yellow 964 Speedster below was tucked in one hall: seemed like a sensible Essen price circa €120k but I didn’t study it too hard after finding a few details lacking. One Lemon Yellow Porsche 911 3.2 Speedster was a favourite car this trip: on the lottery wish list.

You’ll need a lottery win if rising IB Speedster prices keep at it. One of my travelling companions owns a 3.2 Speedster in black with less than 20k miles and full Porsche history. As a low-mileage narrow-body 3.2 Speedster recently sold for £250k at auction, he’s overdue an updated Porsche 911 agreed insurance valuation.

Life doesn’t get much better than a road trip into Germany with beer-loving friends. I highly advise you to follow my lead.