Porsche valuations in 2020

While the retail Porsche market is still pretty sleepy at the start of the year, Porsche valuations have been coming in fast across the first half of January 2020.

Regular clients have commissioned updated insurance valuations for cars including a 1972 Porsche 911E, a modified Porsche 964 with RS equipment and several standard-to-modified Porsche 3.2 Carrera models.

I’ve had a few enquiries from people looking for help to sell their 911s. Strongest at the minute is an early 911 project, unfinished but with most of the parts required to get it completed. I’ll know a little more about that in the coming days.

Pre-purchase inspections remain a bit of a theme. Early impact bumper 911s are in demand and the 3-litre SC (perhaps my favourite air-cooled 911) has come up in a few conversations. I’ve guided a few people on what to look for and there are a few potential inspections looming through January on apparently solid cars.

On the legal valuation side, I’ve been retained by a UK dealer group looking for an independent expert witness to help find the way to a settlement on a collectible later 911 and am also helping UK Trading Standards as an expert witness, in a case which comes to court next month. I did a report on classic Porsche values for some special cars as part of an overseas divorce case at the end of last year: that is an ongoing project.

Air-cooled Porsche market overview January 2020

The market remains pretty short of what I would call nice classic stock, particularly desirable 964 models with low mileage and sensible history. Those cars are increasingly hard to source and owners should ensure that they are properly insured.

Carrera 3.2 models are a bit easier to find but not the easiest cars to sell at the minute. Still, replacement costs for properly nice cars are high so insurance valuations are super important.

Early 911 SC is a definite point of interest. It never ceases to amaze me how many people are reading buyers guides more than ten years old and still coming into this thinking that the SC is a great starter 911. I mean, it is, but not for the reasons it was fifteen years ago.

The days when a Porsche 911 SC was a cheap car you could cut your teeth on are long gone. Good examples fetch strong money and the cars that look cheap are frequently cheap for several very good reasons: normally relating to rust, oil leaks and snapped head studs. 3.2s are often a cheaper way into air-cooled and fit better with a big picture of a buy now/sell in twelve months.

What are you buying? What are you selling? I am always interested in talking to people who are active in the market. Feel free to get in touch if you need any help or ideas.